200-125 | 100-105 | 300-320 | 210-060 | CISSP | 200-105 | 210-260 | 70-697 | 400-051 | 200-310 | 300-115 | 300-101 | EX200 | 640-916 | 2V0-621 | 1Z0-062 | 300-135 | 210-065 | 300-360 | 070-462 | 70-410 | 70-410 | 300-070 | 300-075 | 300-209 | N10-006 | 642-999 | 642-998 | EX300 |
Policy Forum on Freedom of Information | CMFR

Policy Forum on Freedom of Information

cmfrphilippinesArticles and briefing papers on Freedom of Information and FOI legislation in the Philipines.

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The right to information is enshrined in the 1987 Philippine Constitution. The desire for more transparency and accountability, the recognition of the power of information and the valued participation of citizens in public affairs are well justified by the experience with dictatorship (1972-1986) when the press was used an instrument of official deception.

However, 19 years since the first freedom of information (FOI) bill in Congress was filed, the Philippine Congress has yet to pass an FOI Act.

The failure to pass a Philippine FOI law is in contrast with the global surge in FOI laws. It reflects long embedded contradictions in Philippine society, including laws that are at cross-purposes with democratic values.